Upcoming Program

Chuck Collins

Sunday, December 3rd (Open to the public)
Unitarian Universalist Congregation of Wyoming Valley

20 Church Road
Wyoming, PA 
12:00 pm

Monday, December 4th
Penn State Wilkes-Barre, Science 101
Lehman, PA 18627
12:00 PM-1:30 PM

These presentations are Co-sponsored by the Ethics Institute at Misericordia University

As inequality grabs headlines, steals the show in presidential debates, and drives deep divides between the ‘haves” and “have nots” in America, class war brews. On one side, the wealthy wield power and advantage, wittingly or not, to keep the system operating in their favor—all while retreating into enclaves that separate them further and further from the poor and working class. On the other side, those who find it increasingly difficult to keep up or get ahead lash out—waging a rhetorical war against the rich and letting anger and resentment, however justifiable, keep us from seeing new potential solutions.

Chuck Collins is a senior scholar at the Institute for Policy Studies (IPS) and directs IPS’s Program on Inequality and the Common Good where he co-edits Inequality.org. He is an expert on U.S. inequality and author of several books, including 99 to 1: How Wealth Inequality is Wrecking the World and What We Can Do About It.

He is co-author with Bill Gates Sr. of Wealth and Our Commonwealth, (Beacon Press, 2003), a case for taxing inherited fortunes. He is co-author with Mary Wright of The Moral Measure of the Economy, a book about Christian ethics and economic life. His book is Born on Third Base: A One Percenter Makes the Case for Tackling Inequality, Bringing Wealth Home, and Committing to the Common Good (Chelsea Green, Fall 2016).

Chuck Collins is also the author of the book Economic Apartheid in America and has studied income inequality extensively. At age 20, growing up as a member of the 1 percent, he gave up the inheritance he received from the estate of his great grandfather, Oscar Mayer. Joins us to talk about the country’s wealth gap how society is moving towards what he calls “economic apartheid”, and offers his insight and suggestions on how both the wealthy and non-wealthy can work together. Collins’s national and local solutions not only challenge inequality but also respond to climate change and offer an unexpected, fresh take on one of our most intransigent problems. Collins’s national and local solutions not only challenge inequality but also respond to climate change and offer an unexpected, fresh take on one of our most intransigent problems.

 

Filed in: NEPDEC, RIGHT-COLUMN • Sunday, December 18th, 2016
 

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About

NEPDEC’s mission is to create a more inclusive, dynamic culture in our region and to prepare for increasingly complex and diverse communities and workplaces. To achieve these goals, we:
* provide educational programming/consultation,
* support member’s diversity initiatives,
* organize networking and social events for relaxed interaction and sharing, and
* build alliances among historically isolated groups.

Through cooperation, we address regional diversity issues with greater impact and economies of scale.