Category Archives: accountability

Upcoming Workshop on December 5th, Skills for Having Difficult Dialogues

james-m-calderone-ed-d

Dr. Jim Calderone, Ed.D., ACSW, LSW

2:00 pm-4:00 pm

Monday, December 5, 2016
Wilkes University, Henry Student Center, Miller Room, 2nd Floor

1.) Understanding the context of the conversation and incorporating this understanding into our planning;
2.) “Setting the stage” for meaningful discussion;
3.) Integrating “best practices” in our facilitation of difficult topics;
4.) Dealing with the normal testing, resistance, skepticism, and anger which these discussions may trigger;
5.) Preparing one’s self as facilitator for leading difficult discussions;
6.) Following up with participants after the discussion.

James Calderone has a Bachelor of Arts Degree from Wilkes University in English, with a Secondary Education Certification, a Master’s in Social Work from University of Wisconsin/Madison, and a Doctorate in Education from Temple in Adult Development. Calderone also holds a Certificate in Spiritual Direction from Marywood University.

Jim is a full professor in the Social Work Department at Misericordia University and a Licensed Social Worker. He has also served as Dean of the School of Social Sciences and Education at Misericordia. He has been accepted into the Academy of Certified Social Workers. Jim is active as an ordained priest in the American Catholic Church in the United States, and is director of the St. Martin Luther King, Jr. Pastoral Outreach Center in Kingston, PA.

Dr. Calderone has served on the Advisory Board of the Diversity Institute at Misericordia University, and has been an active diversity consultant and trainer. He has completed the Anti-Defamation League World of Difference Program, and presented at many national conferences on diversity planning, curriculum, and training. He currently works with Consult4Diversity, a firm providing assessment and training to colleges, universities, healthcare systems, and businesses.

BBC executives praised for ditching £350,000 bonuses after failing to meet diversity targets

Diversity experts have applauded the decision by BBC executives to forgo their bonuses collectively worth £350,000, after the broadcaster failed to meet its diversity targets.

The corporation set itself stringent targets in 2004 of increasing the percentage of black and minority ethnic staff to 12.5% and 7% at senior management level, to be met by 31 December 2007.

It said that while progress had been made, it would not meet some specific commitments on workforce numbers.

Sally Humpage, employee relations and diversity adviser at the Chartered Institute of Personnel and Development, said the BBC directors had taken a “positive step” that other organisations could learn from.

“This bold step sends out a message to the rest of the company that everyone is responsible,” she said. “Organisations need to set out objectives on diversity and then measure performance around those objectives. The BBC has taken a strong lead where others can follow.”

Atul Shah, chief executive of consultancy Diverse Ethics, and an adviser to the BBC, said the executives’ action was laudable.

“Commercial business leaders rarely sacrifice bonuses under any circumstances and their remuneration is much higher than that of the BBC executive directors,” he said.

But Luke Crawley, assistant general secretary at broadcast union Bectu, said the BBC should go further.

He said: “This is a positive and strong message it is sending out, but it would do no harm for this action to cascade further down the management board.”

Mark Thompson, director-general of the BBC, who set up a diversity leadership council at the corporation in 2005, is still set to receive a bonus as determined by the remuneration committee of the BBC Trust.

This story was first published by Personnel Today

Wimbledon pays women equally – but will Gordon Brown?

The Fawcett Society today issued a challenge to the new prime minister to be the first to ensure that women and men in the UK are equally rewarded for their work.

Although equal pay legislation has been in force for more than 30 years, there’s still a pay gap women working full-time still earn on average 17% less per hour than men working full-time, and women working part-time earn 38% less.

Dr Katherine Rake said: “Women tennis players are finally enjoying equal pay at Wimbledon – it’s time for Gordon Brown to give all women a sporting chance and finally end the pay gap. The ball’s in his court.”

Practical steps to end the pay gapAs the leading campaign for equality between women and men, Fawcett has set out the practical measures that Government could take to end the pay gap. These include:

  • Safeguards: Compulsory pay audits for all organisations
  • Bold ambitions: The Government to set dates for finally closing the pay gap
  • Tackle long hours: Full sign-up to the EU’s Working Time Directive and other steps to tackle our long hours working culture, which limits the ability of women with caring responsibilities to compete on an equal basis with men.
  • Include men: Government and employers to encourage men – not just women – to engage with work-life balance issues.
  • New rights: a right to work flexibly for all employees, unless there is a strong business case against it

Research by Capital Consulting and Cranfield School of Management reveals UK companies are failing to develop top people

Training and development experts have championed the importance of talent management after a new report found more than half of UK businesses are failing to develop their top people.

Research by recruitment outsourcing provider Capital Consulting and Cranfield School of Management, found that only 49% of UK businesses had implemented talent development programmes.

Having questioned 608 HR directors, the research pointed to a lack of financial investment and insufficient senior management support as the main obstacles to talent development.

It found that while six in 10 respondents said talent management was essential to increasing profit, only four in 10 strategically managed their star talent. One in five did not link the strategy to their business plan, while only 15% measured the return on investment.

Victoria Winkler, training, learning and development adviser at the Chartered Institute of Personnel and Development, told Personnel Today she was not surprised by the findings. However, she believed that skills awareness was growing, and was not only on the agenda of HR departments, but also chief executives and finance directors.

“HR teams need to put a talent management structure in place to get the most out of their employees,” she said. “It can have a major impact on the bottom line and retaining staff.”

Jeremy Tipper, group managing director of Capital Consulting, said: “Creating an effective talent management framework has the potential to make HR directors organisational heroes because of the ever-growing impact it will have on business performance.”

Dr Emma Parry, research fellow at Cranfield School of Management, said the report should serve as a wake-up call to employers. “The disconnect between what senior managers are saying and what they are doing is very worrying,” she said.

Suppliers with poor diversity records will fail in public sector procurement battle

Government proposals to increase equality in the multi-billion pound public sector procurement process will see suppliers with poor diversity records shoved to the bottom of the pile, according to legal experts.

The Discrimination Law Review, published earlier this month, stressed that in carrying out procurement, public authorities must have regard to the need to eliminate discrimination and promote equality.

With public sector procurement in the UK worth more than £125bn a year, public authorities represent a major customer base.

Earlier this year, Personnel Today exclusively revealed that technology giant Microsoft ditched a supplier with a poor attitude towards diversity. The company’s HR director Dave Gartenberg said: “In one case, we changed provider because they were cavalier towards the topic. They were supplying a perfectly good service, but we stopped using them.”

Sandra Wallace, head of equality and diversity at law firm DLA Piper, said: “Companies with a strong equality and diversity record will have an immediate advantage when bidding for contracts.

“Just as the Microsoft case highlighted, the Green Paper confirms that companies that fail to recognise the importance of good diversity practice are placing themselves at a competitive disadvantage.”

Critics have argued that firms with poor diversity performance should be excluded from bidding for contracts altogether. But Wallace said the government was unlikely to go that far.
“There is a debate as to whether a simple breach of discrimination law should disqualify a company from tendering for public contracts,” she said. “What is more likely to emerge is practical guidance on how to factor equality into the procurement process.”

The CBI said employers recognised procurement could be a “highly effective tool” for encouraging equality, as long as contracts focused on results, and not on “box-ticking”.

This story was first published by Personnel Today

Suppliers with poor diversity records will fail in public sector procurement battle

Government proposals to increase equality in the multi-billion pound public sector procurement process will see suppliers with poor diversity records shoved to the bottom of the pile, according to legal experts.

The Discrimination Law Review, published earlier this month, stressed that in carrying out procurement, public authorities must have regard to the need to eliminate discrimination and promote equality.

With public sector procurement in the UK worth more than £125bn a year, public authorities represent a major customer base.

Earlier this year, Personnel Today exclusively revealed that technology giant Microsoft ditched a supplier with a poor attitude towards diversity. The company’s HR director Dave Gartenberg said: “In one case, we changed provider because they were cavalier towards the topic. They were supplying a perfectly good service, but we stopped using them.”

Sandra Wallace, head of equality and diversity at law firm DLA Piper, said: “Companies with a strong equality and diversity record will have an immediate advantage when bidding for contracts.

“Just as the Microsoft case highlighted, the Green Paper confirms that companies that fail to recognise the importance of good diversity practice are placing themselves at a competitive disadvantage.”

Critics have argued that firms with poor diversity performance should be excluded from bidding for contracts altogether. But Wallace said the government was unlikely to go that far.

“There is a debate as to whether a simple breach of discrimination law should disqualify a company from tendering for public contracts,” she said. “What is more likely to emerge is practical guidance on how to factor equality into the procurement process.”

The CBI said employers recognised procurement could be a “highly effective tool” for encouraging equality, as long as contracts focused on results, and not on “box-ticking”.

Story first published in Personnel Today