Category Archives: Uncategorized

April 2019

NEPDEC is proud to present the second in our three part webinar series for Spring 2019. These webinars were recorded at our conference on Embracing Diversity for Maximum Impact in the Workplace held on 10/26/2018 at Mohegan Sun Pocono. To view the second in our webinar series, use the title link below.

Series II: The Impact of Cognitively Inclusive Work Teams – Strategies for Success


NEPDEC Executive Director, Brad Kovaleski, addresses the attendees of the Conference on Embracing Diversity for Maximum Impact in the Workplace.

Beyond Sexual Harassment, Equity Across the Gender Divide

Beyond Sexual Harassment, Equity Across the Gender Divide

Simma Lieberman

Webinar: March 21, 2018 from 2:00 PM- 3:30 PM

For access, contact linda@nepdec.org

Background and Purpose:

Accusations and reported incidents of sexual harassment, assault and abuse of power by men over women and, in some cases, over other men, show up in the news every day.

Lawsuits are being filed and reputations are being lost; particularly for those organizations that were warned and took no action, or kept payouts quiet while the offenders were still employed.

Too often the situation is being presented as a “men vs. women” battle. This is unhealthy for organizations and negatively affects people’s ability to work together. It doesn’t solve the problem.

Requests for anti-sexual harassment training are on the rise as people seek solutions, since many do not know what to do.

While anti-sexual harassment training is important to set boundaries, and prevent certain egregious behaviors, it’s not enough. When people have the opportunity to engage in dialogue, hear and understand each other’s perspectives, it reduces objectification and promotes gender equity. They are more willing to collaborate and help each other.

This webinar is designed to initiate the conversation that goes beyond sexual harassment laws to engaging in dialogue across gender and find new ways to connect as peers. Harassment is a form of bullying and it takes people across the gender spectrum to prevent it together.

Topics include:

  • Sexual harassment and the ways in which different types of sexual harassment impact everyone in the workplace (not just targets of harassment)
  • Why some people don’t report harassment or inappropriate behavior
  • How gender dialogue can break isolation, prevent sexual harassment, promote gender equity and increase collaboration across gender
  • Ways to support co-workers and push back against inappropriate behavior
  • How to take actions to go from silent bystander to active ally

Methodology:

During the webinar participants will have opportunities to share their experiences and ask each other questions.

At the end of the webinar people will have time to provide suggested solutions.

Simma Lieberman is internationally known as “The Inclusionist,” because she creates inclusive workplaces where employees love to do their best work, and customers love to do business.

Her passion for diversity and its possibilities began in 1963 when she went on the March On Washington. In 1963. She wishes she could say that it was because of hearing Martin Luther King give his “I Have A Dream” speech, but she was too young to remember it. However, she has always remembered what it felt like to be amongst 250,000 people for the first time of all colors, cultures, and ages, rallying and marching together for change.

Later on, she began working with a multi-cultural organization in New York City, where she was trained to facilitate dialogues with diverse racial and ethnic groups, in order to reduce tension, and create effective working relationships.

Her first culture shock was when she moved from the Bronx to Eugene, Oregon, where she was a member of a multicultural global theater group.

Today, Simma works with leaders of organizations who understand that while training in areas of diversity and inclusion is important, sustainable change only occurs when diversity and inclusion are integrated into the business strategy, and are part of the organization’s cultural DNA. She strongly believes that implementing good diversity management and developing cultural intelligence are necessary for organizations to stay relevant and competitive in tomorrow’s markets.

Her unique ability to view organizations through an inclusion lens also enables Simma to help leaders in organizations uncover employee genius, and leverage their diverse talents and skills at any level.

She has worked with a wide range of organizations that include: Applied Materials, Gulfstream, America Empresarial, Intel, Diageo, Kimpton Hotels, VSP, Boeing, Pillsbury Bakeries and Foodservices, McDonalds, Women’s Foodservice Forum, Oracle, Kaiser Permanente, UC Berkeley, and the US Dept. of Transportation.

Simma is a member of two diversity think tanks, a former co-chair of the San Francisco Regional Chapter of Out and Equal, and former board member of the Northern California Chapter of the National Speakers Association. She is the president of the Northern California Chapter of Society for the Advancement of Consulting, and an inductee to the Million Dollar Consultant Hall of Fame.

Publications that have featured her articles and ideas include The Wall Street Journal, NY Times, Fast Company, The Economist, Forbes, Black MBA, Restaurant Hospitality Magazine, Insight Into Diversity, Working Mother, Cosmopolitan UK, Human Resource Executive, CEO Refresher and CNN.

She is the co-author with George Simons and Kate Berardo, of Putting Diversity to Work, how to successfully lead a diverse workforce, the co-author of The Diversity Calling, Building Diverse Communities One Story at a Time and the author of 110 Ways to Champion Diversity and Build Inclusion and Stress Management for the Motivated, A Workbook For You.

Contact Simma at Simma@Simmalieberman.com or 510-527-0700.

Skills for Having Difficult Dialogues

james-m-calderone-ed-d

Dr. Jim Calderone, Ed.D., ACSW, LSW

2pm-4pm

Monday, December 5, 2016
Wilkes University, Henry Student Center, Miller Room, 2nd Floor

1.) Understanding the context of the conversation and incorporating this understanding into our planning;
2.) “Setting the stage” for meaningful discussion;
3.) Integrating “best practices” in our facilitation of difficult topics;
4.) Dealing with the normal testing, resistance, skepticism, and anger which these discussions may trigger;
5.) Preparing one’s self as facilitator for leading difficult discussions;
6.) Following up with participants after the discussion.

James Calderone has a Bachelor of Arts Degree from Wilkes University in English, with a Secondary Education Certification, a Master’s in Social Work from University of Wisconsin/Madison, and a Doctorate in Education from Temple in Adult Development. Calderone also holds a Certificate in Spiritual Direction from Marywood University.
Jim is a full professor in the Social Work Department at Misericordia University and a Licensed Social Worker. He has also served as Dean of the School of Social Sciences and Education at Misericordia. He has been accepted into the Academy of Certified Social Workers. Jim is active as an ordained priest in the American Catholic Church in the United States, and is director of the St. Martin Luther King, Jr. Pastoral Outreach Center in Kingston, PA.
Dr. Calderone has served on the Advisory Board of the Diversity Institute at Misericordia University, and has been an active diversity consultant and trainer. He has completed the Anti-Defamation League World of Difference Program, and presented at many national conferences on diversity planning, curriculum, and training. He currently works with Consult4Diversity, a firm providing assessment and training to colleges, universities, healthcare systems, and businesses.

Upcoming Workshop on December 5th, Skills for Having Difficult Dialogues

james-m-calderone-ed-d

Dr. Jim Calderone, Ed.D., ACSW, LSW

2:00 pm-4:00 pm

Monday, December 5, 2016
Wilkes University, Henry Student Center, Miller Room, 2nd Floor

1.) Understanding the context of the conversation and incorporating this understanding into our planning;
2.) “Setting the stage” for meaningful discussion;
3.) Integrating “best practices” in our facilitation of difficult topics;
4.) Dealing with the normal testing, resistance, skepticism, and anger which these discussions may trigger;
5.) Preparing one’s self as facilitator for leading difficult discussions;
6.) Following up with participants after the discussion.

James Calderone has a Bachelor of Arts Degree from Wilkes University in English, with a Secondary Education Certification, a Master’s in Social Work from University of Wisconsin/Madison, and a Doctorate in Education from Temple in Adult Development. Calderone also holds a Certificate in Spiritual Direction from Marywood University.

Jim is a full professor in the Social Work Department at Misericordia University and a Licensed Social Worker. He has also served as Dean of the School of Social Sciences and Education at Misericordia. He has been accepted into the Academy of Certified Social Workers. Jim is active as an ordained priest in the American Catholic Church in the United States, and is director of the St. Martin Luther King, Jr. Pastoral Outreach Center in Kingston, PA.

Dr. Calderone has served on the Advisory Board of the Diversity Institute at Misericordia University, and has been an active diversity consultant and trainer. He has completed the Anti-Defamation League World of Difference Program, and presented at many national conferences on diversity planning, curriculum, and training. He currently works with Consult4Diversity, a firm providing assessment and training to colleges, universities, healthcare systems, and businesses.

Video: Culturally Competent Patient Care—LGBT Patients

Culturally Competent Care—LGBT Patients
Donnie Perkins
Vice President, Diversity & Inclusion
University Hospitals

Shane Snowdon
Director, Health and Aging Program
Human Rights Campaign

The Human Rights Campaign will detail its Healthcare Equality Index assessing whether healthcare facilities provide equitable care to LGBT patients, and University Hospitals will tell you how it developed successful outreach programs for the LGBT community.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aatGNBnYTu0

To access the presentation slides, go to DiversityInc Best Practices.

Donnie Perkins

DonniePerkins310Donnie Perkins is the Vice President for Diversity and Inclusion at University Hospitals, Cleveland Ohio. He works collaboratively with key stakeholders to integrate diversity and inclusion into the fabric of the organization in support of the UH mission, vision and core values.  He oversees the coordination of diversity and inclusion initiatives across the system. His duties include creating and coordinating a strategic approach to diversity and inclusion, providing leadership and focus for diversity affairs, developing and leading a system-wide structural framework for diversity efforts, creating and managing a measurement system that represents a meaningful benchmark for diversity and inclusion efforts; serves as a liaison between UH community organizations, businesses and agency leaders, and establishes new partnerships with external constituencies.

Prior to joining the leadership team at University Hospitals, Mr. Perkins served as Dean and Director of the Office of Institutional Diversity and Equity at Northeastern University in Boston, MA for 13 years.

Mr. Perkins is currently pursing a Doctorate in Law and Policy at Northeastern University. Mr. Perkins is a graduate of Central State University, Wilberforce, Ohio and received a Masters of Science in Executive Management from Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute in Hartford, Conn.  Mr. Perkins was a Ford Foundation Fellow in the Education Policy Fellowship Program, completed the Harvard Graduate School of Education’s Management Development Program in 1998 and the American Association of Colleges and University’s Millennium Leadership Institute in 2002.

Shane Snowdon

Snowdon310Shane Snowdon, MA, heads the LGBT Health & Aging Program of the Human Rights Campaign. Prior to joining HRC, Snowdon was Founding Director of the Center for LGBT Health & Equity at the University of California San Francisco, for 14 years the nation’s only LGBT office in a healthcare or health education setting. She has provided LGBT health training and consulting for hundreds of hospitals, health professional schools, and other health organizations throughout the country, and she has convened numerous LGBT health conferences. She has also written extensively on LGBT health, and served as Project Adviser for The Joint Commission’s LGBT Field Guide (2011).

In previous work, Snowdon was Executive Director of a national women’s health group, an urban domestic violence agency, a citywide training program for ex-inmates, and a regional environmental center. She was also Editor/Publisher of the national publication Sojourner, and has been widely published on LGBT and women’s issues.

Hidden Biases: The Most Dangerous Enemy

Have you ever noticed that the greatest dangers in life are those that you can’t see? A diagnosable disease may be nasty, but at least you can do more about it than a vague malaise that you hardly notice, but which is eating away at your health and well-being. Whether it be in my workplace or my body, I would rather have a problem I can see and fix than something subtle and elusive.

Bias is one of those problems that can be either obvious and fixable or illusive and undiagnosable. I know, for example, a manufacturing company which recently discovered that some of its employees are members of the Ku Klux Klan. By contrast, there’s the CEO who suspects that bias is keeping her gay employees from moving up in the company but she can’t quite identify where the problem lies. Who is in bigger trouble? Clearly the CEO whose problem is most difficult to spot.

I call this kind of subtle bias “Guerilla Bias.”™ Like “guerilla warfare” in which the enemy hides behind beautiful foliage, “Guerilla Bias.”™ is difficult to see because it lies concealed in the foliage of what we think of as good intentions, kind words, and so-called thoughtful acts. “Guerilla Bias”™ is dangerous because it is hidden. It is also dangerous because it is based on the unconscious premise that women, minorities, the disabled, and those who are outside the so-called “majority” population are somehow fragile, quick to explode, or in need of special treatment.

Managers can be particularly guilty of this type of “Guerilla Bias.”™ It shows up in their reluctance — read: “fear” — to provide negative, constructive feedback to minorities and women. Take, for example, the case of Susan, a young Filipina at a Jersey City hospital. She looked at me with complete bewilderment as I struggled to figure out why she and the other Filipinas on her floor were not performing as well as non-Filipino nurses. Practically in tears, she said, “Nobody ever tells us what we are doing wrong.” Susan, like millions of other potentially valuable employees, will never be able to move up in the organization and is clearly lost to an industry which is ever-hungry for qualified, dedicated health care professionals. Without feedback and carefully delineated goals, productivity suffers and un-coached employees like Susan begin to “measure down” to management’s expectations.

Not only are valuable employees left behind, but lack of appropriate feedback has other costs as well. For example, if a supervisor fails to provide needed feedback to a minority or female employee, fellow team members are apt to perceive of that person as being coddled or held to a lower standard thus creating fertile ground for feelings of racism or sexism.

Another type of “Guerilla Bias”™ involves our old friend political correctness. Political correctness makes sense — to a point. There was a time for speech reform. An important message, for example, was sent when we called a halt to the universal use of the pronoun “he.” However, what started out as a reasonable adjustment has mutated into a way to conceal bias. Too many of us carefully choose the best politically correct term, phrasing, or even point of view because that gives us the illusion that we have no biases. In fact, the excessive use of political correctness can mask, even from ourselves, the biases that we have.

Anyone, from any group, of either gender, or of any color can be guilty of “Guerilla Bias.”™ The first step to defeating it is to be honest with ourselves about how we really feel about other groups. Having a bias is not the end of the world; the only shame involved is if we make no effort to improve. The second step is to expose ourselves to the very people who make us uncomfortable. This exposure, along with the knowledge we gain from it, will gradually diffuse the fear and eventually weaken even our most deeply hidden biases.

Originally posted on Dr. Thiederman’s site: Opening Gateways to Understanding

Sondra Thiederman is a speaker and author on diversity, bias-reduction, and cross-cultural issues. She is the author of Making Diversity Work: Seven Steps for Defeating Bias in the Workplace (Chicago: Dearborn Press, 2003) which is available at her web site or at www.Amazon.com. She can be contacted at:

Sondra Thiederman, Ph.D.
Cross-Cultural Communications
4585 48th Street
San Diego, CA 92115
Phones: 619-583-4478 / 800-858-4478
Fax: 619-583-0304
www.Thiederman.com / STPhD@Thiederman.com

The WBI 3-Step Action Plan

What Bullied Targets Can Do

Three things that are simple to list, but very difficult to accomplish. It’s an uphill, David ‘n Goliath, struggle.

Step One – Name it! Legitimize Yourself!

  1. Choose a name — bullying, psychological harassment, psychological violence, emotional abuse — to offset the effect of being told that because your problem is not illegal, you cannot possibly have a problem. This makes people feel illegitimate. The cycle of self-blame and anxiety begins.
  2. The source of the problem is external. The bully decides how to target and how, when, and where to harm people. You did not invite, nor want, the systematic campaign of psychological assaults and interference with your work. Think about it. No sane person wakes up each day hoping to be humiliated or berated at work.
  3. There is tremendous healing power in naming. Hard to believe at first, but very true.

Step Two – Take Time Off to Heal & Launch a Counterattack

Accomplish five (5) important tasks while on sick leave or short-term disability (granted by your physician).

  1. Check your mental health with a professional (not the employer’s EAP). Get emotionally stable enough to make a clear-headed decision to stay and fight, or to leave for your health’s sake. Your humanity makes you vulnerable; it is not a weakness, but a sign of superiority. Work Trauma, by definition, is an overwhelming, extraordinary experience.
  2. Check your physical health. Stress-related diseases rarely carry obvious warning signals (e.g., hypertension – the silent killer). Read the current research on work stress and heart disease.
  3. Research state and federal legal options (in a quarter of bullying cases, discrimination plays a role). Talk to an attorney. Maybe a demand letter can be written. Look for internal policies (harassment, violence, respect) for violations to report (fully expecting retaliation).
  4. Gather data about the economic impact the bully has had on the employer. Put dollars and cents to each instance of turnover (at least 2x the salary of the person affected) to include all expenses associated with replacement (recruitment, demoralization from understaffing, interviewing, lost time while newbie learns job), and absenteeism, and lost productivity from interference by the bullying.
  5. Start job search for next position.

Step Three – Expose the Bully

The real risk was sustained when you were first targeted (you have a 64% chance of losing your job – involuntarily or by choice for your health’s sake). It is no riskier to attempt to dislodge the bully. Retaliation is a certainty. Have your escape route planned in advance. Remember, good employers purge bullies, most promote them.

  1. Make the business case that the bully is “too expensive to keep.” Present the data gathered (in Step 2) to let the highest level person you can reach (not HR) know about the bully’s impact on the organization. Obviously in family-owned, or small businesses, this is impossible (so leave once targeted).
  2. Stick to the bottom line. If you drift into tales about the emotional impact of the bully’s harassment, you will be discounted and discredited.
  3. Give the employer one chance. If they side with the bully because of personal friendship (“he’s a great conversationalist and a lunch buddy”) or rationalize the mistreatment (“you have to understand that that is just how she is”), you will have to leave the job for your health’s sake. However, some employers are looking for reasons to purge their very difficult bully. You are the internal consultant with the necessary information. Help good employers purge.
  4. The nature of your departure — either bringing sunshine to the dark side or leaving shrouded in silent shame — determines how long it takes you to rebound and get that next job, to function fully and to restore compromised health. Tell everyone about the petty tyrant for your health’s sake. You have nothing to be ashamed about. You were only doing the job you once loved.

Answering critics of our approach …..

Pragmatists argue that our 3-Step Method will only get you fired. They are right in most cases. So, it is important for you to know why we suggest what we do. Our method accomplishes four goals:

  • Goal 1: Your personal health must be the priority or you will not live long enouth to take another job. You have to discover if stress-related health complications have begun and take steps to reverse them. Stress exacerbates diseases that can kill. Put your health, not your job, first. See a physician, ask for blood tests related to stress-induced harm. See a good therapist to restore your faith in your own worthiness.
  • Goal 2: The true purpose of the bullying-costs-data-collection-project (Step 2, Part 4) is to distract you from the emotional damage. Too many wounded targets crawl between the bed sheets and can’t get out. You need something to do to continue to function, to bounce back. This task of estimating the fiscal impact of bullying is not only factual and informative for the organization (which it promptly chooses to ignore), but the employer’s response to the facts will help convince you about the irrationality of the entire bullying process. You didn’t cause it and they don’t seem to care if it ever stops. They are too afraid to do the right thing.
  • Goal 3: Compel employer responsibility for putting you in harm’s way. No one is responsible for being bullied, for inviting the misery upon themselves. The employer has known about the bully before and chosen to retain him or her (attorneys call it negligent retention). Employers want a catfight between employees so that they can blame it on “personality conflict.” The reality is that employers establish all conditions of work. If there are poorly skilled managers or executives, it is because of a dereliction of duty. Employers are lazy and trust on-the-job experiences to teach people to be good and humane managers. This is wrong. The leadership team is responsible for all bullying! It would not happen without executives’ explicit or tacit approval. So, hold their feet to the fire. Expose the bully. Demand changes (for the sake of the organization).
  • Goal 4: Take control of your departure from the place. WBI research found that you have a 66% chance of losing your job once targeted. Exposing the bully is more about your mental health than being an effective way to get the bully fired. Trauma is intensified if you leave the job (voluntarily or after being terminated) if you do not leave holding your head high and pointing accusatory fingers at the wrongdoers. In other words, since you are most likely to leave, once targeted, leave by telling everyone what happened to you and by whose hands. Targets who skulk away in silence, shrouded in personal shame, suffer the most. It can take a year or more to rebound to the point of being able to seek work. Those who leave proudly, bounce back the fastest.

Contrast our approach with traditional advice from HR types, coaches, & “career experts”…..

Things NOT to do after discovering you are the target of workplace bullying:

  • Do not feel guilty for not confronting your bully in response to the aggression. If you could have, you would have. You are not made that way.
  • Do not limit your decisions to act in ways that sacrifice personal integrity and health just to survive to keep a paycheck. Survival strategies alone create even more serious long-term health and career problems. If the place will not change, plan your escape.
  • Do not wait for the impact of bullying to fade with time. It must be stopped for the effects on you to stop.
  • Do hold the employer accountable for putting you in harm’s way. It is not your personal responsibility as the victim to fix the mess you did not start. Employers control the work environment. When you are injured as a result of exposure to that environment, make the employer own the responsibility to fix it.
  • Do not try to reinvent yourself as a political animal. If you would have been able to be cutthroat, you would have acted accordingly. You do not have to mimic the unethical bully to counter her or his misconduct.
  • Do not trust HR to give you advice that serves your own best interests — they work for management and are management. Simple facts.
  • Be wary of EAP counselors until they have proven to you that your confidential case details will not be reported to management and that they understand how work environments affect individuals’ health.
  • Do not ask for relief from the bully’s boss. That is the person who loves her or him most. (And if there is no love there, there is fear. The boss fears the bully and cannot stop him or her.)
  • Do not tell your story from a purely emotional injury angle. It scares away potential supporters.
  • Do not share your voluminous documentation with anyone at work. No one cares as much as you do. In the wrong hands, it can be used against you.
  • Do not ask others (HR, union reps, management) to make the bully stop for your sake. They will disappoint you. Rather, you will make the business case and ask them to stop bullying fortheir own self-interests.
  • Do not agree to be treated by any mental health professionals who cannot believe your experience and want simply to change you so that you will not trigger similar reactions from future bullies.
  • Do not pay a retainer to an attorney until you’ve exhausted cheaper alternatives to get your employer to take your complaint seriously.
  • Do not confide in anyone at work until they have demonstrated (and not just talked about) loyalty to you.

For more information we recommend reading The Bully At Workby Dr. Gary Namie and Dr. Ruth Namie (Sourcebooks)

Source: The Workplace Bullying Institute