Cultural Lenses: “I Can See Clearly Now”

Cultural Lenses: “I Can See Clearly Now”

Tuesday, February 8, 2011
9:00am to 11:00pm

King’s College
133 North River Street, Wilkes-Barre, PA 18711

Tuesday, February 8, 2011
1:00pm to 3:00pm

PSU/Hazleton, Chestnut Cottage Conference Room
76 University Drive, Hazleton, PA 18202


Arthur Breese, MA, MS



Linda Trompetter, PhD

How well do we see through our cultural lenses? Are we shortsighted, myopic, or farsighted? Our cultural lenses color our world, bending reality into patterns that we’ve come to know and accept through our own cultural experiences. Cultural awareness is the foundation of communication, and it can be achieved by becoming aware of our own cultural values, beliefs and perceptions. Why do we do things in a particular way? How do we see the world? Why do we react in that particular way? Since culture is learned, not inherited and the learning is for the most part progressive, incremental, and implicit—we absorb it slowly—it sinks from the conscious and becomes reflexive and second nature. It takes all of our childhood and most of our adolescence to learn the rules and limits of  “acceptability” a culture hands down to us, and by the time the learning is finished we have integrated it and apply this knowledge without thinking.

Participants will:

  1. examine how individuals’ different cultural lenses, behaviors, and communication styles can lead to conflict,
  2. identify participants’ own cultural lenses to understand how they may impact interpersonal relationships, and
  3. develop skills for practicing effective cross-cultural communication.

Arthur Breese, Director of Diversity for Geisinger Health Systems and President of the Board of NEPDEC, brings 20 years of diversity education and professional experience to this workshop. He has been the Director of Diversity and Mediation at East Stroudsburg University, and before that served as associate director of The Diversity Institute.

Linda Trompetter, Director of the Northeastern Pennsylvania Diversity Education Consortium, works through her consulting firm, Consult4Diversity (www.consult4diversity.com) to bring optimal solutions to educational and business organizations wishing to enhance their diversity outreach and strategic planning. She founded and directed The Diversity Institute for 18 years, and was a tenured professor of philosophy before devoting herself fulltime to the work of NEPDEC.


About

NEPDEC’s mission is to create a more inclusive, dynamic culture in our region and to prepare for increasingly complex and diverse communities and workplaces. To achieve these goals, we:
* provide educational programming/consultation,
* support member’s diversity initiatives,
* organize networking and social events for relaxed interaction and sharing, and
* build alliances among historically isolated groups.

Through cooperation, we address regional diversity issues with greater impact and economies of scale.