Gender, Bullying, and Harassment: Strategies to End Sexism and Homophobia in Schools

Elizabeth J. Meyer, PhD

March 22, 2012 (9-11am)
Luzerne Intermediate Unit #18, 368 Tioga Avenue, Kingston, PA 18704

March 22, 2012 (3-5pm)
place to be announced on this site 

March 23, 2012 (9-11am)
Intermediate Unit #19, 1200 Line Street, Archbald, PA 18403

All of these young men have committed suicide. These tragedies are bringing national attention to the horrors of gender-based bullying. Now is the perfect moment to demand that we all do a better job of handling the issue of homophobia and gendered harassment. What can be done?

Clockwise from top-left: Justin Aaberg, Asher Brown, Ryan Halligan, Tyler Clementi, Seth Walsh, Billy Lucas, Zach Harrington

NEPDEC is proud to bring Dr. Elizabeth J. Meyer to our area for workshops that will

  • Assist Teachers in their efforts to recognize and intervene in all incidents of homophobia in the school community.
  • Help School Leaders revise their bullying and harassment policies to explicitly include ALL forms of gendered harassment (sexual, sexual orientation, and gender identity/expression), and to develop programs that reduce the prevalence of homophobic and transphobic behaviors.
  • Provide Principals with strategies to communicate clear expectations to staff about how to implement bullying, harassment, and non-discrimination policies.
  • Support School District Administrators with information on effective strategies to use in their fight to allocate funds for ongoing education on gender-based bullying, effective reporting and tracking mechanisms, and programs to enhance understanding of bullying, harassment and specifically address homophobia, transphobia and gendered harassment.
  • Inform the Parents of a bullying victim or a child engaged in gender-based bullying about resources and effective ways to intervene on behalf of their child.

The issue of gender-based bullying cannot be addressed by punishing the few individuals who are publicly implicated in a tragic event. The fight to eradicate gender-based bullying needs to be systemic; it needs to address the needs of school professionals, parents, and students, so that all these constituencies have the tools they need to become aware, gain skills, and join in supporting the effort to stop the carnage.

Elizabeth J. Meyer, PhD, a regular contributor to Psychology Today, is an Assistant Professor in the School of Education at California Polytechnic State University in San Luis Obispo, California. She is the author of two books: Gender, Bullying, and Harassment: Strategies to End Sexism and Homophobia in Schools and Gender and Sexual Diversity in Schools.  She has been a classroom teacher, outdoor educator, and a Fulbright Teacher Exchange Program grantee.  She has been involved in grassroots education and equity work in the U.S. and Canada for the past 15 years.  She completed her M.A. at the University of Colorado, Boulder and her Ph.D. in Education at McGill University in 2007.  Dr. Meyer has worked as an independent consultant, a researcher, and as a lecturer at Concordia and McGill Universities in Montreal, Quebec.  Her work has been published in journals such as Gender and Education, McGill Journal of Education, LEARNing Landscapes and The Journal of LGBT Youth.  She also has chapters in several books including: Combating Gender Violence in and Around Schools (Leach & Mitchell, eds. 2006), Media Literacy: A Reader (Macedo & Steinberg, eds., 2007), Queering Straight Teachers (Rodriguez & Pinar, eds.,  2007), Girl Culture: An Encyclopedia (Mitchell & Reid-Walsh, eds., 2008), Rocking Your World (Churchill, ed. 2009) and Diversity and Multiculturalism: A Reader(Steinberg, ed., 2009).

Register now

See full Spring schedule


About

NEPDEC’s mission is to create a more inclusive, dynamic culture in our region and to prepare for increasingly complex and diverse communities and workplaces. To achieve these goals, we:
* provide educational programming/consultation,
* support member’s diversity initiatives,
* organize networking and social events for relaxed interaction and sharing, and
* build alliances among historically isolated groups.

Through cooperation, we address regional diversity issues with greater impact and economies of scale.